No, the smallpox vaccine did not save us from smallpox. That’s another myth.

“One of the medical profession’s greatest boasts is that it eradicated smallpox through the use of the smallpox vaccine. I myself believed this claim for many years. But it simply isn’t true. One of the worst smallpox epidemics of all time took place in England between 1870 and 1872 nearly two decades after compulsory vaccination was introduced.
 
After this evidence that smallpox vaccination didn’t work, the people of Leicester in the English midlands refused to have the vaccine any more. When the next smallpox epidemic struck in the early 1890s the people of Leicester relied upon good sanitation and a system of quarantine. There was only one death from smallpox in Leicester during that epidemic.
 
In contrast the citizens of other towns (who had been vaccinated) died in vast numbers. Doctors and drug companies may not like it but the truth is that surveillance, quarantine and better living conditions got rid of smallpox; not the smallpox vaccine.
 
It is worth pointing out that Edward Jenner, widely feted as the inventor of the smallpox vaccine, tried out the first smallpox vaccination on his own 10 month old son. His son remained mentally retarded until his death at the age of 21. Jenner refused to have his second child vaccinated.”
 
— Vernon Coleman, MB, ChB
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